Meet the team

We are a team of developers, artists and other talented individuals aiming to make Arch as user friendly as possible by providing interface solutions to things you normally have to do in a terminal

Cookie Alice
Cookie Alice

Administrator

Head of administration responsible for the hosting, website, communication channels, test management and communication between the RebornOS team, community and contributors

Shivanandvp
Shivanandvp

Developer

Shiva is the main developer for the Fenix Installer, and the RebornOS Welcome application.

Rafael
Rafael

Head Developer

The head developer of RebornOS Rafael is responsible for creating the ISO and keeping everything running smoothly.

SoulHarsh007
SoulHarsh007

Developer

Developer of Tuxbot & RebornOS Fire

Azaiel
Azaiel

PR Manager / Developer

Azaiel is responsible for our communication towards companies, community and the head developer of RebornOS ARM

Techie
Techie

Support

Assisting users

Contributors

These people contribute to RebornOS with Code, art and other invaluable skills and for that we're thankful.

Arnulf
Arnulf

Tester

Test RebornOS ARM installers

Ron
Ron

Tester

Test RebornOS installers

Elkrien
Elkrien

Tester

Test all RebornOS developments

Hall of Fame

People that have made significant contributions in the past

Keegan

Distribution founder/Head Developer

Keegan started RebornOS as a fork of Antergos that he wanted to add more features too. From there it involved into it's own distribution offering new features and innovation past it's originally core. Keegan had to step away from the RebornOS project for personal reasons in 2020.

izznogooood

Resource Provider

For providing us with a server in the past when we needed it to perform our work on RebornOS

Mettke

Resource Provider

Was providing us with servers in Europe where we couldn't have supported users otherwise and your support in our package signing procedure.

TriVoxel

Graphic designer

Creator of the logo and other art for RebornOS Otherwise known as SidedVirus

A little about the history of RebornOS

 

The Founder, Keegan, penned down his experiences in the form of blog posts on the website before he decided to part ways with RebornOS. Since his journey into Linux is an integral part of the history of RebornOS (and it is also fascinating to read about), we present to you, in Keegan’s own words, “Keegan’s Linux Journey”

Unfortunately the fourth part never arrived. So this is part of the story of the beginnings of this distribution. We leave you this story:

 

Keegans Linux Journey

Keegan’s Linux Journey: Part 1

Published May 22, 2020

From Windows User to My Search for Arch

Back in November of 2016, I had just bought by very first laptop. Did I know what I was doing, or what all those specifications listed for each product (such as RAM and CPU) meant? Absolutely not! But I did know that such a device would allow me to better write works of fiction (in which I was involved at the time, although I never got to the publishing stage – once getting fairly close to completion of the actual writing stage however), as well as complete work that was necessary for my schooling as I had just entered high school that previous year. So if any of you live in or near the United States, you are probably familiar with Black Friday. A day ironically placed right after Thanksgiving – which, you guessed it, is a day we thank God for all that He has chosen to bless us with, a tradition begun by the Pilgrims in the 1600s who fled Europe for the New World in an effort to escape religious persecution. So the day after Thanksgiving, the US celebrates by indulging our sense of greed and desire for the accumulation of more possessions. All across the nation, stores boast enormous sales and discounts for nearly everything, everywhere. As such, one can imagine that for a high schooler with limited money, this was the day I chose to purchase my first laptop. Why a laptop you might ask? The simple answer is because I had no idea what I was doing. The longer answer might be that I at least knew I wanted to be able to take the device with me and not have it tied down to one specific location. And so I bought what I thought to be a fabulous deal. It was, but it was definitely on the low end in terms of quality. Windows 10 ran slowly for me, and I honestly was not all that pleased with the invasive policies that I had heard Microsoft employed in their then-new operating system.

So it was that when I became sick over that Christmas break, I thought I would use that time to explore the wonderful world of software and the Internet. I quickly became fascinated with making my computer do unusual things, such as using a built-in feature of Windows to make it respond to specific voice prompts in the voice of Jarvis from Iron Man. But spend money for such things? Now that was just something I did not have the budget for! And so it was that I kept coming across amazing free software that would fit my desire perfectly – and nearly all of them had multiple download options, the consistent download option being something called Linux. What was this thing that had so much quality, free software? A quick Google search later (unfortunately, I was still using that invasive search engine at the time!), and I discovered result upon result of seemingly… different things. Things with names such as Linux Mint, Ubuntu, and ZorinOS. Well, thought I, everyone online seems to be including this thing called Linux Mint in their “Top 10 Distributions for Beginners” articles, and it even has Linux in its name! So that must be what I am looking for. Dualbooting though? Never heard of it. In fact, it seemed way too complicated and dangerous to me at the time. So it was that I eventually stumbled upon YUMI – a piece of software that allowed you to just select your desired distro in the application itself, whereby it would automatically download and burn the distro to your USB of choice in persistence mode. Using this method, I was able to boot into Linux Mint and have an effectual – although limited – dual-boot setup without risking my hard drive at all. But now I had another world to explore. A world of software stores, of Linux Mint desktop extensions and addons, and a world of themes. Not to mention customization. As you can imagine, this was all a bit confusing for me. I understood how to use the software store due to my previous exposure with Macs at school in a Photoshop class, but themes, extensions, and addons? Now that was an entirely new, confusing world!

Apparently, it was a little too confusing for me. I stumbled along for nearly a month, even achieving a Windows 7 theme setup on my Linux Mint installation. But I just could not quite wrap my head around the extensions and addons. And if my Jarvis recreation from Windows 10 was any indicator, you can imagine how much I enjoyed tinkering with my system. But for the time being, I needed a little extra hand holding. So back to the online search it was for me! By now, I was officially on the road to joining the ranks of distrohoppers.

After a week of consideration, I finally decided upon ZorinOS. I know, many of you are probably groaning on the inside. Perhaps you have an issue with their payment method for ZorinOS Ultimate. Or perhaps you dislike the fact that you cannot seem to find their code on Github or Gitlab. Or maybe it is even the package they install by default on your system that sends back basic metrics to them in regards to system crashes and such on your installation. But for me, it was just what I needed to thrust me forwards into the world of Linux. In fact, I had almost given up on figuring out Linux before I came across ZorinOS. ZorinOS was my last shot, and thankfully, it hit the bullsye! Due to its excellent theming manager, I was able to finally make sense of how to install and apply themes on my desktop. I quickly figured out GNOME extensions (they were much simpler to understand than the addon and extension combination of Linux Mint!), and I even started to embrace the terminal. Before long, I was performing my updates in the terminal, and even spending much of my time there!

ZorinOS had only one downfall – it was too good. After two lovely months of smooth sailing, I began to get bored. I began to feel my confidence rising, and my inner distrohopper began to yearn for something new, exciting, and unpredictable. And every Linux user knows that when one begins to yearn for something unpredictable, you have no further to look than Arch Linux. And maybe Gentoo. But Gentoo was way beyond me still at this point, and so Arch it was. Besides, who doesn’t feel the allure to the distro after seeing enough “I use Arch btw” memes online? And so the next stage of my journey was about to begin.

 

Keegan’s Linux Journey: Part 2

Published May 22, 2020

From Mere User to Community Edition Developer

It was now the month of March, and I was feeling pretty comfortable with ZorinOS, prompting my decision to expand my horizons and chance the unpredictable waters of Arch Linux. But Arch itself was a little too much for me at the time still, as I wanted to be able to use a graphical installer like I had for Linux Mint and ZorinOS. And so the search began. It quickly became clear that based on online articles, either Manjaro or Antergos seemed to be the perfect fit. I almost chose to go with Manjaro, but then heard that it was even less of an Arch derivative than Antergos was. And if I was going to be diving into the waters of Arch, I wanted to actually have a system that ran Arch – not one that was merely like Arch, holding me back from the latest and greatest updates. And so it was that I chose to go with Antergos! Due to the fact that I was still dualbooting with Windows 10, I quickly found out that I needed to utilize the manual partitioning option within Cnchi. Now that was a headache for me! It took me a weekend and numerous forum posts on the Antergos forum to finally get that sorted out, with much of the help on the forum coming from a guy named Fernando Maroto. Thanks to him and his kind help, I finally had the Antergos system of my dreams! Now I just had to customize the GNOME desktop that I had installed. I know, I made some questionable decisions, deciding to run GNOME. I should have probably gone with KDE (my current desktop), but GNOME was by then familiar. I was used to its quirks and limitations due to my usage of a modified version of it on ZorinOS. Besides, I had yet to get familiar with Antergos and the rest of the Arch Linux ecosystem!

And so it was that I began my journey into the world of Arch. Eventually though, after getting my desktop just the way I wanted it, I began to think back to the kind help I had received from Fernando. Without him, I would still be stuck on ZorinOS. Or at least not on something in the Arch family. So, thought I, perhaps I should join the forum and give back to the amazing community that first helped me. And with that, my decision was made. I quickly became an avid forum user, and rose in the ranks to be in the list of those with the top 10 number of posts of all time on their forum – straight to the day that it shut down in 2019. What a sad day that was. But that was not this day! For a day would come when the courage of Antergos failed, when out of exhaustion it forsook its users and broke all bonds of development, but it was not that day. (Thank you Tolkien). That day would arrive a full three years later. For now however, the future looked bright and I quickly grew in my understanding of the inward workings of Linux. Or at least how the operating system worked. It was through helping others that I learned this, rather than receiving any sort of formal instruction on it. And so it remains to this day. I still have yet to take a single class on the topic of Linux, but thanks to the community, anything is possible!

Eventually, I had an idea for Cnchi that was actually implemented by an Antergos developer, Karasu – a person I still consider to be a friend. It dawned on me that my struggles in installing Antergos would have been minimized if I had had a guide right in the installer to walk me through it. And so that was my idea. Why not include a button that launched an embedded webpage that gave instructions on dualbooting right in Cnchi? This idea caught the eye of Karasu, and eventually it came to be. After seeing an idea of mine own launched on systems across the entire world, I began to think of other ways I could help. But I did not want to merely be someone who asked others to do the work for me, and so I began to think of ways I could actually contribute as well. Thus, the Antergos Community Edition was birthed. Granted, I took up more than my fair share of Karasu’s time initially, as he graciously walked me through the steps on creating my own ISO file. But eventually, I had it figured out. Sort of. Well enough to at least create one that is. Soon I had added the Deepin desktop to my community edition, among a few other optional Desktop Environments and Window Managers. But Deepin remained my focus, and with the help of a new user, Velkerk, he and I slowly worked out most of the kinks in Deepin on Antergos.

This flurry of activity caught the attention of others on the forum, and before long there were several community editions – one from Joe Kamprad that focused on NVIDIA drivers, and one from Fernando that focused on making offline installations possible. I really was beginning to give back to the community!

But good times do not last forever. Eventually, a time must come for an idea to be reborn from the ashes and given new life. And such it was with my community edition. I began to run into issues with Deepin that were easily fixable, but required I modify Cnchi slightly. For obvious and understandable reasons, an installer is what makes a distro unique. An installer determines what sets a newly installed system apart from other similar systems. And so, it was completely understandable when Karasu told me that as a community edition, I should continue to develop my edition in such a way so as to not modify their installer. This made perfect sense to me, but it did result in my edition having some issues. Some issues that I even knew how to fix! And thus the meeting of Velkerk, another user (forgot their name), and me came to be. A meeting to decide exactly how to proceed in the best interest of our users.

I bet you can imagine what happens next! To find out though, stay tuned for Part 3, which details the beginning of RebornOS – or as it was known initially, Reborn.

 

Keegan’s Linux Journey: Part 3

Published June 8, 2020

In the last part of this little series, we left off when I had begun meeting with Velkerk to discuss the future of the Deepin community edition of Antergos that I had been developing for the last several months. We talked about it, and eventually decided to be adventurous enough to attempt to create our own separate distro. However, such a decision was not without the risk of failure. I barely even knew how to edit the build script for the Antergos ISO at that point! And so it was that I continued to maintain the community edition of mine while also working on creating my own ISO based as much as possible from Arch’s scripts rather than those of Antergos. I started with what I knew worked – the Antergos versions of the scripts. Slowly, over the course of the month of September, I managed to modify those scripts to be as close to the Arch original as possible. Then, I began to work on decoupling Cnchi from the rest of Antergos – a task that was in no way easy to do. In fact, that project took me until December 13th, when I finally unveiled the very first release of RebornOS! Only at that time, I had not actually decided on a name for this new project. Just like EndeavourOS did, I decided upon a temporary codename for the project, to be replaced later when I felt I had truly completed it. After all, at this point in time only the Deepin desktop was working out of all the 15 DE / WM options in the installer! I felt that the temporary title “Reborn” was rather fitting, as it perfectly described the process my project had undergone over these last months. My community edition of Antergos had been reborn as its own distro! Many people appear to assume that the fact I am a strong Christian had to do with my name choice. While perhaps that has influenced my vocabulary in some ways, it was not a conscious influence in the creation of the name, Reborn.

The Antergos developers were incredibly gracious to me in allowing me to post this news on their own forums, and soon a few users were giving my new distro a try. In fact, one such user by the online name of Palanthis, became increasingly interested to the point that we even teamed up as co-developers! A small but amazing community quickly formed, and before long we all voted on the logo and the motto of the distro. As for the name, it stuck with people, although we did eventually tack on OS to the name, making it Reborn OS. Being a 15-year-old minor who had spent the majority of his money on purchasing his first laptop nearly a year earlier, I had extremely limited funds. And so it was that we began using WordPress.com . Perhaps it was not the most professional choice, but it served the needs of our growing community. We even made use of Github and SourceForge for our repository! Having a 0 USD budget really made me rather resourceful.

This were going well, and Palanthis was taking care of the public side of things which freed me up to do the development. But then a user named Alberto arrived to our forums one fateful day. He was armed with the promise of experience, having a background in design and a strident philosophy of “less is more”. So we unwittingly put him in charge of managing our forum for us – a mistake that would prove difficult. He soon became overbearing, forcing through changes that our users (and Palanthis and I) did not want to see. For instance, an obnoxious plugin that played rock music on our forum in the background. Now who needs perpetual rock music when they are navigating a forum? I have yet to meet such a person. It eventually became a race of me undoing his changes and him re-applying them. In fact, I worried often while at school that I would lose the forum to him before I returned home! The final straw came when he got so disgruntled at Palanthis and I that he cited the Unix Rules to us a little while after he removed the “like” buttons on our forum. Now last time I checked, Unix and Linux are not quite the same thing, and hold to slightly different philosophies. For instance, he was in favor of the “do one thing and do it well” approach to such an extent that he was all in favor of us not adding any new features – ever. Additionally, he wanted us to remove almost all our installer options too! In the end, he was the one who chose to leave, and we did so on surprisingly friendly terms. So I do not want to paint to you a completely bad picture of him, as in the end we parted as friends. Or at least friendly acquaintances.

About this time, Reborn began to attract the attention of a few Youtube personalities in the Linux world. Unfortunately, we were still an incredibly young project, and were not quite prepared for something like that. As such, several of those reviews were a little disappointing for us, particularly as almost every Youtube review to this date on us is really just a critique on the Deepin desktop on an Arch-based system, rather than Reborn as a whole. I mean, come on people! We offer 15 different DE / WM options! Just because Deepin is our default option, does not mean that is all there is to us. If someone really wants to give us an accurate review, please consider testing features that make RebornOS unique, such as what was then called RUM (Reborn Updates and Maintenance, now called RebornOS FIRE – Features and Improvements in RebornOS made Easy), an application that I have developed myself particularly for RebornOS users. Anyways, rant over. We saw an enormous influx of users, and soon I met the next person that was to be on our team – SidedVirus (now known as Trivoxel).

I met him one day as I was browsing the Antergos forums (yep, Antergos was truly amazing! They still allowed me to be part of the community over there, and so I was helping some Antergos users out during some extra time I had that day), and he was mentioning to the community a game he had created. No one was really taking any notice of him over there, but I really liked what he had made and upon chatting, we learned we were of similar ages. I invited him to my team, and asked him if he would like to tackle some graphic design issues over here, such as our icon and the images in our modified version of Cnchi. Well, as you have probably already guessed, he said yes.

So now our team had both a co-developer and an animator! Still though, yet more were about to join. First came one by the name of Badmem, who appeared shortly after Trivoxel (I think) on our forums. He has always – and continues to be – a great friend of mine and one who has helped me get through the “dark days”, as he and I call them. The days in which Palanthis had disappeared and I had no one else to turn to but he and Trivoxel. But today is not that day (I think I said that in a recent article as well. It figures though, as I am a bit of a Tolkien fan). Today, we have yet to introduce ShAdOw! ShAdOw is the expert who masterfully taught me how to sign our RebornOS packages, set up a server, maintain that server, and even create this very website on that server. Basically he is the local expert on everything server and security related. All in all, he is amazing, and we as RebornOS would most likely not even exist today without him.

Despite all this excitement though, a shadow was yet to fall over RebornOS and cover us in a second darkness (I did it again didn’t I? Perhaps I shouldn’t be writing this immediately after watching The Fellowship of the Ring). Needless to say however, the day Palanthis disappeared was a sad one. He was here one day and gone then next. But, in case you are wondering, no – he did not spontaneously burst into flames and perish. Instead, life merely got too busy for him all of a sudden, and he no longer had time to devote to us here at RebornOS like he had for the last several months. As such, the work in maintaining and developing RebornOS fell mostly to me, and it is thanks to the companionship of Badmem as well as his constant testing of our new developments that kept RebornOS alive during the upcoming months.

The account of what happened after the “dark days” awaits in Part 4 of this embarrassingly long saga! So stay tuned to find out what happens next (although, if you have been around here long enough, you might already know).